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Posts Tagged ‘mental health’

Mental Health America releases 2016 Back to School Kit

school bus

The start of a new school year is upon us, and with it comes with feelings of excitement and anticipation, along with some fear and anxiety. As kids prepare to head back to class, they’re exposed to issues that may not have played a prominent role in their lives over the summer. Back-to-school time is a great time for parents to get a refresher course on the best ways to approach topics like body image, mental health, sex, drug and alcohol use, and LGBTQ issues when talking with their kids. And kids and teens can benefit from information about health, self-esteem, self-image, and disorders that may affect the way they see or treat themselves.

Mental Health America just released its 2016 Back to School Toolkit, which includes key messages, articles, social media messages and graphics, infographics, and other materials to help both parents and kids have a happy and healthy school year.

Download the toolkit

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Career Opportunities at United Way 2-1-1 service in Durham

Vols-Staff with Question Mark

Please see below for a career opportunity with our friends at United Way 2-1-1 in North Carolina:

    The United Way 2-1-1 service in Durham, North Carolina is currently seeking a Data Coordinator. The Data Coordinator assists with the coordination and upkeep of resource data for United Way 2-1-1. Responsibilities include quality assurance monitoring of data, distributing reports, and responding to inbound and outbound contacts which may range from telephone calls, email response or other mediums of contact contingent upon client specifications.

    Click here to read the full job description and instructions for applying.

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Career Opportunities at MHA-NYC

Vols-Staff with Question Mark

Please see below for a career opportunity with our friends at MHA-NYC:

    MHA-NYC is recruiting for the exciting new role of Program Director for the NYC Support program. NYC Support will continue the pathbreaking history of its predecessor, LifeNet, as New York City’s premier information and referral, supportive counseling, and crisis intervention services by telephone, text, and web chat. In addition, NYC Support will utilize cutting edge technologies to provide peer support services, enhanced follow-up, and eventually appointment scheduling to New Yorkers 24/7/365. MHA-NYC is looking for a Program Director to manage all aspects of the program’s operations and clinical practice, and continue LifeNet’s legacy of dynamic leadership in the crisis center community.

    Read the full job description and application instructions here.

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Like being alive again

MHM 2016 Social Media Images-Twitter Profile

As Mental Health Month draws to a close, let’s take a moment to think about recovery. Check out the infographic below courtesy of Mental Health America for more.

Helplines play such a large role in recovery for many people. They’re often the first to hear from someone who is struggling, providing an empathetic, understanding, and safe place to talk. They connect people with counseling, medical treatment, and other resources. And they’re always there to listen and provide continued support to someone, regardless of where in the recovery process they may be. Our deepest thanks go out to all the helplines who are fostering good mental health in their communities!

Life in Recovery Fact Sheet

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Familiar Callers: Changing Our Views and Interactions


Crisis Hotlines have been around for over 40 years, and so have individuals that call regularly. These types of repeat calls are often referred to as exhausting, challenging and frustrating. Viewing these calls as such can introduce the danger that someone in actual need may not receive the full benefit of the services offered. Though the caller may not be presenting a crisis at the moment, your support and empathic listening can aid in the prevention of escalating into a crisis. Often times, the callers are utilizing the same unsuccessful maladaptive coping skills to try to resolve their situation. They have most likely burned many bridges, have very little or no support from family and friends, and feel lonely and isolated. They are often turned away and told no or that nothing more can be done. It is important to remember that these callers can also experience crises.

As many centers are adopting a trauma informed care approach, the use of recovery oriented language and care is emerging. The term Frequent or Chronic caller is being replaced with Familiar or Experienced caller, to name a few.

Some centers or crisis workers struggle with setting limits and boundaries. Callers can benefit from the structure and learn to develop and rely on their own strengths. The callers are the experts on what helps them and it varies for every person.

Challenge yourself and your center to create a thoughtful approach to handling these calls, while maintaining boundaries, consistency, and setting limitations. Establish firm and consistent boundaries in a respectful manner. Some centers have time limits per call, others have limits on how many times an individual can call. Once you decide on a limit, it is important for all crisis workers to remain consistent. Create a clear guideline for crisis workers to follow. Example below:

    Initial call of the day:
  • Listen, reflect feelings
  • Don’t dictate
  • De-escalate

  • Subsequent calls:
  • What has changed since your last call?
  • What was your plan when your last call ended? Have you tried…?
  • Have you followed through with your plan?
  • What else can you try?

  • When speaking with someone who has been contacting your center several times per day, it is okay to ask the individual:
  • To restate their crisis plan
  • Who else can they call besides the crisis hotline?

Be cautious of providing the same intervention techniques each time, it can be beneficial to treat each call like a brand new call every time. Perhaps something has changed and what didn’t work yesterday may work today. Remember there is value in listening and acknowledging their reality. Consider what it must feel like to live with this every day.

Thoughtful Suggestions:

    1. Help the individual identify the precipitating event that caused them to call/chat/text. “What has happened/changed since your last call?”
    2. Help the individual prioritize and stay focused. Acknowledge that it seems there has been a lot that has affected their lives. “I’m wondering, which situation is most important for you to resolve.” “What can I help you with today?” “From what you have shared, there seems to be a lot going on for you. Which one is the most worrisome for you today?”
    3. It is better to interact than react. Validate that they are doing the best they can. “It sounds like you are doing the best you can. What can you try differently to cope with this?”
    4. Identify coping skills. “What has helped you in the past? Have you tried that today?”
    5. Help them explore new, healthy coping skills. “I’m wondering if you have thought of new ways of coping.”
    6. Explore the importance of retelling their story repeatedly, “How is this helpful for you?” “What are you hoping to get from this conversation today?”
    7. Empower them to work toward recovery.
    8. Limit exploration of the situation and problem solving.
    9. Help the caller focus on what he/she can do to help him or herself today.
    10. Support the caller in developing a reasonable, specific and attainable plan. Provide additional resources, such as a warm line for support.

Other helpful statements:

    “You really seem comfortable doing what you have always done, that’s more familiar to you. How would it be for you to try…”
    “It sounds like you feel scared to make any changes.”
    “It sounds like you have a sense of what it is going to take to change and you’re not sure you want to do that.”
    “It seems discussing your past experiences are more comfortable for you than trying to make changes.”

For research on Familiar callers, please use link below for information:

Guest blogger Lisa Turbeville is Manager of the Resource and Crisis Helpline and Legal Services at Common Ground, and serves on the Board of Directors for CONTACT USA.

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A dark, empty room with no escape

MHM 2016 Social Media Images-Twitter Profile

Depressive disorders are extremely common — 15.7 million American adults experienced a major depressive episode in 2014. It’s much more than simply feeling sad, it’s a medical condition with physical symptoms. Check out the infographic by Mental Health America to learn more as we continue our recognition of Mental Health Month, and be sure to visit their website for lots of great materials to help you spread the word to your community.

Depression Mental Health America infographic

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It’s described as “being powerless against your own mind”

MHM 2016 Social Media Images-Twitter Profile

May is Mental Health Month, and there’s no better time to beef up your knowledge of mental health facts and information. There are a number of great materials available via Mental Health America, Canadian Mental Health Association, and NAMI.

We’ll be bringing you some of these resources on the blog throughout the month. Starting with Mental Health America’s Infographic about Anxiety. Anxiety disorders are some of the most common mental health conditions — experienced by an estimated 21% of American adults. People living with anxiety describe it as, “Being so scared you’re paralyzed” and “Being powerless against your own mind.” Check out the infographic below for more information on what anxiety is, how it feels to those who experience it, and tips for tackling it.


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Get your Mental Health Month Toolkit

MHM 2016 Social Media Images-Twitter Profile

Since 1949, May is recognized as Mental Health Month, thanks to efforts spearheaded by Mental Health America. In preparation for this year’s Mental Health Month, MHA has released its 2016 Mental Health Toolkit for download. It includes things like:

  • Media Materials including key messages, drop-in article, sample press release, and MHM Sample Proclamation
  • Infographic Fact Sheets that incorporate plain language explanations of diagnostic criteria for mental illnesses, first person accounts about how it feels, a breakdown of common myths and misperceptions, screening data from mhascreening.org and coping skills on the topics of Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, Psychosis and Recovery
  • Worksheets that individuals can use to make a mental health plan to help them work through symptoms and challenge intrusive thoughts
  • Social media materials including sample posts and images
  • Banner images for your website or Facebook and Twitter accounts
  • Mental Health tips for each day of the month

Download your toolkit here.

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Upcoming webinars via Mental Health America


Mental Health America is participating in several free webinars this month.

Peer Supports for Transition-Aged Youth
Date: Wednesday April 6, 2016
Time: 2pm EDT
Transition-Aged Youth(TAY), including foster youth, youth who have been through the juvenile justice system, and youth with mental health diagnoses, have unique needs that are often unaddressed. At this crucial stage . . . Read more and register

Peer-Run Respite Programs
Date: Thursday, April 14, 2016
Time: 2pm EDT
Peer-Run Respite Programs serve as successful alternatives to hospitalization or other traditional crisis services with focuses on support, hope, and . . . Read more and register

Best Practices in the Use of Self-Directed Care to Support Recovery in Women
Date: Thursday, April 21, 2016
Time: 2pm EDT
Building relationships and support systems is an important part of recovery. Mental Health America’s highly innovative It’s My Life: Social Self-Directed Care program combined . . . Read more and register

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