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Posts Tagged ‘substance abuse’

New funding opportunities from SAMHSA

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The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) recently release information on new funding opportunities for addressing the opioid crisis and suicide prevention. Below is information provided by SAMHSA:

iCarol attending the National Council for Behavioral Health Conference

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From April 2nd – 5th, iCarol Co-founders Jackie and Neil McKechnie will attend the National Council for Behavioral Health Conference in Seattle, Washington. Many of our friends and clients have encouraged us to attend and have spoken highly of the conference, the people and organizations it attracts and the fantastic learning opportunities it presents, so we’re looking forward to experiencing this first hand.

In case you are not yet familiar with this organization, the National Council for Behavioral Health with its 2,800 member organizations, is dedicating to serving millions of adults, children and families living with mental illnesses and addictions. The cornerstone of their mission is to advocate for Americans’ access to comprehensive, high-quality care so that everyone has the tools needed for recovery. Many of you may also be familiar with their Mental Health First Aid program, a course that many of our users have not only taken, but their agencies often provide this training to their community. This highly impactful program has trained nearly 1 million people to play a role in helping someone experiencing a mental health or addictions emergency by providing immediate intervention and empathy while encouraging professional support. This program empowers all people, regardless of their personal field of expertise, to care for others and not ignore situations or feel powerless to help when they see mental health emergencies play out in front of them. It also highlights the importance of everyone having basic knowledge of mental health and addictions issues, which ultimately saves lives and reduces stigma.

We’re looking forward to learning more about this organization, attending some amazing sessions, and connecting with those in attendance to see how we might be able to work together. If you’re an iCarol user and you’re going to be there, we’d really love to connect so we can say “hi” and catch up with you, and perhaps grab a bite to eat or cup of coffee in between sessions. With this being such a large conference and knowing how much there is going on, it’d be great to plan ahead and schedule a time to connect and make sure we don’t miss one another. Please reach out to so we can find a time to meet up at what is sure to be a great event. See you in Seattle!

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Career Opportunity at Partnership for Drug-Free Kids

Partnership for Drug-Free Kids

Partnership for Drug-Free Kids is currently seeking a Bilingual Helpline Social Worker/Addiction Specialist.

Below are the details about the position responsibilities and qualifications. Should you want more information about this opportunity, or if you’d like to apply, please reach out directly to Partnership for Drug-Free kids at the email listed below.

    Helpline Social Worker/Addiction Specialist – Bilingual

    Partnership for Drug-Free Kids helps families impacted by adolescent substance abuse and addiction. We are seeking a bilingual (English/Spanish) individual with a master’s degree in social work or a related field, and a background in addiction treatment for a grant-funded long term consulting assignment (approximately 3-4 months in length). This consulting role is an integral part of our Parent Support Network, with primarily responsibility for handling our toll-free telephone Helpline for parents and caregivers of kids involved with drugs and alcohol.

    In addition to the Helpline, the Parent Support Network is composed of extensive, science-based resources for parents and families at www.drugfree.org and a new system of peer-to-peer parent coaching, which pairs trained parents who have experienced a child’s substance use disorder with parents whose kids are struggling now. The Parent Support Network relies heavily on the principles of Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT), which has been shown to be effective in helping the family members of someone involved with substance use in ways that produce positive outcomes for the person using, and for the family as well.

    This consulting role will focus on the Helpline, answering the phones, documenting all call reports within the iCarol data collection/reporting system and directing families to services within their communities as well as Partnership if and when appropriate.

    Major Responsibilities

  • Answer and document all helpline calls. We are seeking an individual to work a part-time (30 hours per week) evening and weekend schedule – onsite or from home – but can be flexible and consider a variety of schedule options in terms of the number of days per week, hours available, etc.
  • Support parents / caregivers by: providing science-based information about teen substance use; helping parents understand their child’s problem and make a plan to address it; employing CRAFT principles of listening, communication and support; directing to appropriate services / resources as necessary
  • Collect and record caller data, and handling after call follow-up
  • Refer where appropriate to the Network’s parent coaching system
  • Contribute clinical expertise to other members of the Partnership team as needed
  • Respond to e-mails and electronic messages from Parents and Caregivers
  • Qualifications

  • Master’s degree in counseling, social work, human services, or any closely related field — and a background in addiction treatment (substance abuse assessment and counseling)
  • Ability to speak, read and write in English and Spanish
  • Has experience in crisis intervention and aware of best practices in assessing for suicidality, homicidality as well as child neglect and abuse
  • 2 years minimum of direct clinical or telephone helpline experience
  • Prior experience in the substance abuse field
  • Strong interpersonal communication skills with the ability to convey empathy and understanding to those in need
  • Cultural awareness, sensitivity and counseling competency
  • Strong organizational skills
  • Additional Preferred Assets:

  • Knowledge of iCarol reporting system
  • Knowledge of CRAFT, familial interventions and/or motivational interviewing for substance use disorders.
  • Familial/adolescent counseling experience a major plus
  • Strong writing skills for answering emails, blog posts and parent follow-up.
  • Crisis intervention/helpline/hotline/telephonic care experience
  • How to Apply:

    The Partnership values diversity in our workforce and encourages candidates of diverse backgrounds to apply. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to jobs@drugfree.org No phone calls, please.

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Mental Health America releases 2016 Back to School Kit

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The start of a new school year is upon us, and with it comes with feelings of excitement and anticipation, along with some fear and anxiety. As kids prepare to head back to class, they’re exposed to issues that may not have played a prominent role in their lives over the summer. Back-to-school time is a great time for parents to get a refresher course on the best ways to approach topics like body image, mental health, sex, drug and alcohol use, and LGBTQ issues when talking with their kids. And kids and teens can benefit from information about health, self-esteem, self-image, and disorders that may affect the way they see or treat themselves.

Mental Health America just released its 2016 Back to School Toolkit, which includes key messages, articles, social media messages and graphics, infographics, and other materials to help both parents and kids have a happy and healthy school year.

Download the toolkit

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Grant Opportunities for Substance Abuse Treatment

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This week, SAMHSA announced several funding opportunities for substance abuse treatment and prevention providers.

You’ll find the list of the opportunities with links below. Any questions about these opportunities should be directed to the contacts found on the details page.

    Provide Substance Use Disorder Treatment to Minority Women at High Risk for HIV/AIDS – Up to $33 Million – Read the details
    Expand Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity in Adult Treatment and Adult Tribal Healing to Wellness Courts – Up to $48.6 Million – Read the details
    Capacity Building Initiative for Substance Abuse and HIV Prevention for At-Risk Racial/Ethnic Minority Youth and Young Adults – Up to $24.4 Million – Read the details
    Youth Drug and Alcohol Prevention Efforts – Up to $1.2 Million – Read the details

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March is Problem Gambling Awareness Month

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As we head into March, it’s time to have the conversation about Problem Gambling. From the National Council on Problem Gambling:

NCPG encourages everyone to Have the Conversation about Problem Gambling. Most adults gamble or know someone who gambles, and therefore could benefit from programs to prevent gambling addiction. We believe many who suffer in silence do so because they don’t know why they developed a problem, what gambling addiction is or where to get help.

Statistics suggest that 5 million Americans and more than 1 million Canadians meet the criteria for gambling addictions. Of those who struggle with a gambling problem, 75% will also have issues with alcohol and an estimated 38% with other drugs. A staggering 1 in 5 people with a gambling problem will either attempt suicide or die by suicide. This is the highest rate of suicide among all addictions. Advocates are working hard to ensure that problem gambling is addressed as the public health issue it is, but unfortunately many still incorrectly view it as a moral failing or issue of “weak will” much like the stigma that alcohol and drug use has faced in the past.

Problem gamblers achieve the same effect from gambling as someone else might get from taking a drug or from drinking. The act of gambling alters their mood. A problem gambler who once achieved a “high” from winning or the rush of playing will continue chasing that same feeling. And just as individuals build up a tolerance to the affects of drugs or alcohol, the same can happen with a problem gambler. As they engage in the gambling activity of their choice, it takes more and more of the experience to achieve the same emotional effect they desire.

It’s important to discuss the topic of problem gambling with the help-seekers who reach your helpline who may be at risk or are showing signs of problem gambling. There are specific resources to point them to that can help them confront these issues, discuss them with non-judgmental listeners, and receive referrals for assistance. Visit NCPG’s website for information and resources. You’ll also find the number where you can call/text for help (1-800-522-4700) and a link to their live chat.

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West Virginia Launches First Statewide 24-hour Mental Health and Substance Abuse Helpline

Help4WV

Congratulations to iCarol clients Help4WV on starting the first statewide 24-hour mental health and substance abuse hotline in West Virginia. Read the governor’s announcement and other articles, and be sure to follow them on Twitter, too!

Congrats again to the staff of Help4WV from the team here at iCarol, and thank you for your service to the people of West Virginia!

Want your helpline’s accomplishments featured on our blog? You can anytime!

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Join Partnership for Drug-Free Kids for a Facebook Chat tonight

WebinarsTonight the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids is hosting a live Facebook chat on teen marijuana use. Heather Senior, LCSW, Partnership Parent Support Network Manager will lead the chat, and will answer questions to help parents and others better navigate the changing marijuana landscape and have productive conversations with teens and other youth.

To take part in the chat, visit and “Like” the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids’ Facebook page at 8 p.m. EST this evening. The chat will take place right under the announcement image in the comment thread. Refresh your browser throughout the chat to view all comments in real time. You can submit your questions ahead of time to .

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Depression, suicide, and the loss of Robin Williams

Like so many others, we’re deeply saddened by the death of famous actor and comedian Robin Williams. His death, preliminarily declared a suicide by local authorities, comes as a shock to many who knew him as a comedic genius who brought laughter and joy to millions. While he openly discussed his drug and alcohol addictions and commitment to sobriety, he never publicly acknowledged any diagnosis of depression or other mental illness. His publicist and friends, however, have shared that he was “battling severe depression” and in Tuesday’s press conference authorities said he was seeking treatment for depression.

This tragic and untimely death of someone known and loved by millions has started a dialogue about mental illness and suicide. Since the announcement of Robin Williams’ death and the way he died, there has been an outpouring of support, discussion about mental illness and addictions, words of encouragement, and sharing of important suicide prevention resources and numbers to call for help, the most common being the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

To aid in this important discussion and opportunity for education, we’d like to share with you this blog by Hollis Easter, Hotline Coordinator for Reachout of St. Lawrence County, Inc. and suicide prevention educator.

And while we’re educating others about how to positively contribute to these discussions, let’s talk about that common saying: “Suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem.” People who say this surely mean well and are only trying to help. Perhaps they think they’ve found that magic phrase that will speak to the person who they want to help and get that person to “snap out of it.” The truth is that most people who attempt suicide were not doing so as a permanent solution to a temporary problem; they wanted a permanent end to weeks, months, or years of personal torment and agony, often due to a medical condition. To say that it’s a temporary issue greatly minimalizes the deep pain and very real suffering they are going through, and likely have been going through for some time.

For more thoughts on why this turn of phrase should be avoided, check out another recent blog by Hollis titled

It is our hope that out of this loss, more people will be educated on the topics of suicide and mental illness. And while a flurry of media attention was placed on Mr. Williams’ death it’s important to note that on Monday an estimated 10 Canadians and 107 more Americans (108 including Mr. Williams) also died by suicide. Each of these deaths is tragic and leaves in its wake at least six people deeply devastated by their loss.

If you work in the suicide prevention industry: Thank you. Your patience, empathy, and compassion is a true gift and you’ve surely touched more lives than you may realize. Whether you speak directly with those contemplating suicide on a hotline, educate others on warning signs and intervention methods, or play one of the numerous other roles in the industry, the work you do saves lives.

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