Have questions?  info@icarol.com

Follow Us! iCarol software twitter iCarol software Facebook iCarol software YouTube iCarol software LinkedIn     |    FREE TRIAL     |     SIGN IN
Logo
Logo

Author Archive

Dana

Dana joined the iCarol team in 2013 after 12 years of direct service and administrative duties at a blended 2-1-1/crisis intervention/suicide prevention center. As the Communications and Social Media Manager at iCarol, you'll find her presenting Webinars, Tweeting, Blogging, Facebooking, and producing other materials that aid helplines in their work.

Career Opportunity at Autism Society of North Carolina

The Autism Society of North Carolina is currently looking to fill the position of Advocacy Database Specialist.

The Advocacy Database Specialist will manage and develop information on resources available to support people with autism, their families and the professionals who serve them in North Carolina. This staff person would be responsible for ASNC’s iCarol database and online resource directory including development, entry, and maintenance of community resource listings, database reporting functions, monitoring quality and accuracy of all database information, and training and supporting users of the iCarol Connection and Resource system. The position supports the Advocacy Departments work by assisting department staff with administrative duties.

This job is a partial work from home, and partial work from one of our regional offices, so you must be close enough to one of our office locations to commute as well. For a list of locations, click on your county and see if a local office location is listed https://www.autismsociety-nc.org/find-help/#

Essential Duties and Responsibilities include:

  • Operate the web-based information and referral database used by staff as well as the online Resource Directory used by the public. Determines appropriate means by which to accomplish this integral responsibility.
  • Research, enter and update statewide listings of community resources for people on the autism spectrum and their families.
  • Contact community organizations by phone and email to verify information.
  • Review and edit written content for grammar, spelling errors, and length.
  • Attach standardized classification system terminology to resource entries using the AIRS standardized taxonomy for human resources, as well as develop effective search keywords.
  • Develop and utilize content formatting and standardization rules, resource updating processes, other database policies, and training materials.
  • Communicate changes in database program services to staff and public.
  • Assist staff to help local ASNC chapters and support groups with the publication of local community resource guides.
  • Develop new and creative ways to use database and its information to further the mission of ASNC.
  • Review database system contacts entries for accuracy and problem solve with supervisory staff to improve data collection.
  • Train and support iCarol Connection system users.
  • Assist staff with development of system reports for internal and external audiences.
  • Assist Advocacy Department staff with administrative support work including but not limited to preparing and maintaining state lobbying reports, preparing ASNC info packets for elected officials, maintaining evaluation records, chapter volunteer background checks and availability of volunteers, compiling information and updating records, mailing packets of materials including Welcome Packets, securing locations and handling logistics for events, taking notes at meetings, arranging travel and other duties as assigned.
  • Other duties as assigned in support of the mission of the organization.

Qualifications include:

  • Attention to detail: is thorough when performing work; double checking for accuracy of information to ensure precision and high quality of work.
  • Time management and task prioritization skills; can set priorities and adjust them as needed to meet urgent needs.
  • Ability to problem solve; can analyze, develop solutions, test results, and use feedback to make modifications.
  • Excellent writing skills with an emphasis on correct grammar and the ability to summarize and edit written content. Skills testing may be a requirement of employment.
  • Superior computer skills: Use of MS Office Suite and internet research skills required; familiarity with information and referral databases and/or standardized taxonomy is preferred. Computer skills tests may be a requirement of employment.
  • Able to use excellent customer service skills to interact by phone, email/letter, or in person with a diverse array of community resource organizations, families, individuals on the autism spectrum and other stakeholders.
  • Acceptance of feedback from a variety of stakeholders and the ability to use to improve performance.

Education Requirements:

    Bachelor’s degree (B. A.) from a four-year college or university in human services, library and information sciences, database management, or related field and one year of experience in customer service, research, and/or data entry; or an Associate’s degree in one of the above fields and two years related experience; or a High school diploma and an equivalent combination of education and experience.

Supervisory Responsibilities:

    Monitor, coordinate and instruct volunteers and/or interns

Learn More and Apply

Continue Reading No Comments

January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month

CW: This blog post discusses human trafficking, abuse, violence, and exploitation.

The United States recognizes January as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. While this is designation originated in the US in 2010 by presidential proclamation, many other countries, including Canada, take part in education and awareness around human trafficking and slavery during January as well.

What is Human Trafficking?

Human trafficking occurs when someone, using force, fraud, or coercion, obtains some form of labor or commercial sex act from the victim, often for the direct profit of the perpetrators. Traffickers use violence, manipulation, or false promises of well-paying jobs or romantic relationships to lure their victims into trafficking situations. Human Trafficking is often described a modern-day slavery. Traffickers may recruit, transport, harbor and/or exercise control, direction or influence over the movements of a person in order to exploit that person, typically through sexual exploitation or forced labor.

Who are the victims?

Anyone, of any age, race, religion, sex, or background can become a victim of human trafficking, however certain groups of people are more commonly victimized and enslaved, or vulnerable to trafficking, than others. Women and children are more likely to be victimized than men. Human trafficking particularly affects women and children who are BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and people of color), immigrants or migrants.

How big is the problem?

Human Trafficking and Slavery are more prevalent than most people probably think. According to the US State Department, by some estimates, as many as 24.9 million people — adults and children — are trapped in a form of human trafficking around the world, including in the United States. Instability caused by natural disasters, conflict, or a pandemic can increase opportunities for traffickers to exploit others. During the COVID-19 pandemic, traffickers are continuing to harm people, finding ways to innovate and even capitalize on the chaos.

How can you tell if someone might be a victim?

There are many signs to watch for. A few of the most common are:

  • Does the person appear disconnected from family, friends, community organizations, or houses of worship?
  • Has a child stopped attending school?
  • Is a juvenile engaged in commercial sex acts?
  • Is the person disoriented or confused, or showing signs of mental or physical abuse?
  • Does the person show signs of having been denied food, water, sleep, or medical care?
  • Is the person often in the company of someone to whom he or she defers? Or someone who seems to be in control of the situation, e.g., where they go or who they talk to?
  • Does the person have freedom of movement? Can the person freely leave where they live? Are there unreasonable security measures?

Read more about common signs. You can even download an indicator card to carry with you to remind you of what to watch look for.

How you can help

Anyone can join in the fight against human trafficking. If you suspect someone is being victimized, you should not confront them while they are in the presence of the suspected perpetrator, nor should you confront a suspected perpetrator. This could be dangerous for you and the victim. Instead, experts advise you reach out to emergency services or law enforcement to report suspected trafficking.

There are many things you can do to help fight human trafficking beyond reporting suspected trafficking when you see it. You can get involved in your community’s efforts to end trafficking, donate to organizations that fight human trafficking, and much more. Click here for a comprehensive list of ideas for how you can help.

Resources:

Hope for Justice
US Department of State
Administration for Children & Families – Office on Trafficking in Persons
The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)
The Human Trafficking Institute
Public Safety Canada
Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Continue Reading No Comments

January is Stalking Awareness Month

CW: This blog post discusses stalking, sexual assault, and intimate partner violence.

January is National Stalking Awareness Month (NSAM), and though millions of men and women are stalked every year in the United States, the crime of stalking is often misunderstood, minimized and/or ignored.


What is “stalking?”

Stalking is a pattern of behavior directed at a specific person that causes fear. Many stalking victims experience being followed, approached and/or threatened — including through technology. Stalking is a terrifying and psychologically harmful crime in its own right as well as a predictor of serious violence.

Facts about stalking*

injured person with a bruise on their face
  • In 85% of cases where an intimate partner attempted to murder their partner, there was stalking in the year prior to the attack.

  • Of the millions of men and women stalked every year in the United States, over half report being stalked before the age of 25 and over 15% report it first happened before the age of 18.

  • Stalking often predicts and/or co-occurs with sexual and intimate partner violence. Stalkers may threaten sexual assault, convince someone else to commit assault and/or actually assault their victims.

  • Nearly 1 in 3 women who were stalked by an intimate partner were also sexually assaulted by that partner.

  • Stalking tactics might include: approaching a person or showing up in places when the person didn’t want them to be there; making unwanted telephone calls; leaving unwanted messages (text or voice); watching or following someone from a distance, or spying on someone with a listening device, camera, or GPS.

What is the impact on stalking victims?*

packed bag
  • 46% of stalking victims fear not knowing what will happen next.

  • 29% of stalking victims fear the stalking will never stop.

  • 1 in 8 employed stalking victims lose time from work as a result of their victimization and more than half lose 5 days of work or more.

  • 1 in 7 stalking victims move as a result of their victimization.

  • Stalking victims suffer much higher rates of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and social dysfunction than people in the general population.

How you can help

Helpline staff and volunteers can do a number of things to help people who reach you and talk about being stalked:

  • Provide validation and empathy.

  • Don’t minimize behaviors that are causing the person concern (e.g. “I wouldn’t worry.” “That doesn’t sound harmful.” “They’re only text messages.”)

  • Encourage the person to keep keep detailed documentation on stalking incidents and behavior. More information and a template can be found here.

  • Use Stalking Harassment and Risk Profile (SHARP) Risk Assessments at your organization. More information and a template can be found here.

  • Empower and help the person develop a safety plan that is flexible, comprehensive, and contextual. More information can be found in this guide for advocates.

  • If your organization does not provide direct services to assist with the issue, provide helpful resources such as a local domestic/intimate partner violence helpline, sexual assault helpline, legal resources, law enforcement, etc.

We all have a role to play in identifying stalking and supporting victims and survivors. We encourage you to learn more from the Stalking Prevention, Awareness, and Resource Center at www.stalkingawareness.org.

*Source: Stalking Prevention, Awareness, and Resource Center (SPARC)

Continue Reading No Comments

“It’s a Wonderful Life” and Imagining a World Without Helplines

This blog was originally published in December 2020. As this pandemic rages on, the message remains relevant, and so we’re sharing it with you again to mark the 2021 holiday season.

Content warning: This post discusses sensitive topics such as suicide and abuse.

In a year as strange and relentless as 2020, I needed a sense of normalcy more than ever this holiday season, and that came in the form of my annual viewing of “It’s a Wonderful Life.” In years’ past, the film’s theme of suicide prevention struck me most. But like a lot of things, the experience of 2020 placed a new filter over the movie for me, and I started noticing elements that, while always there, hadn’t been as noticeable to me before.

The crises of 2020 were relentless. And when the bad news just keeps coming and it feels there’s no end in sight, no clear solution or relief, it can be easy to fall into total despair. George Bailey experiences this very thing in “It’s a Wonderful Life.” George passed on his own dreams so the dreams of others could be realized and those he loved could be happy, and for awhile he appears okay with that. Then a series of crises compound, and old trauma and resentments quickly rise to the surface. George, completely devoid of hope and solutions, is now staring into the icy churning waters of a river flowing beneath him. For all his good deeds and sacrifices, look at how bad things are. What was it all for? He contemplates how the world might be better off if he wasn’t here, or if he never existed at all.

George’s scenario got me thinking about the exhaustive work so many people have been doing all throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, only to have things stay the same, or get worse, day in and day out, with no relief in sight. When there’s no clear impact or positive change to motivate you, to reassure you that your sacrifices and work matters, how do you keep going? How do you resist despair and hopelessness?

I think the answer is similar to what we see in “It’s a Wonderful Life.” George can’t see his positive impact until he’s shown a world without him in it. Perhaps we need to briefly imagine what the world would look like without those forces of good working hard to help others.

What would our world look like now if helplines, contact centers, and other community services didn’t exist?

Contact centers and Information and Referral services like 2-1-1 commonly act as their community’s primary source of information about COVID-19, providing information on everything from common symptoms to look for and where to go to get tested. In many cases 2-1-1 became the official state/provincial source of COVID-19 information. Without that centralized information delivery service, health departments, emergency rooms, and medical offices are overwhelmed with people seeking information. Phone lines jam and human resources are syphoned from direct care treating those who are ill. Fewer people know where to get tested. More people get sick, and more lives are lost as a result.

The economic fallout from the pandemic will be with us for some time. Some say the financial recovery may take longer than public health recovery. Thankfully, people looking for financial assistance for their very survival—help with utilities or food—had places to reach. Places where a compassionate and knowledgeable specialist could, in a single interaction, provide ideas and resources that may help with several needs. Without those contact centers, those in need are left feeling lost and overwhelmed. Already worn down by their situation, they must now spend time and effort navigating the network of community services on their own. They don’t know how the systems work. They are frustrated and even more overwhelmed. It takes longer to access assistance. They miss several meals. They only find out about a fraction of the services for which they were eligible.

Quarantines and stay-at-home orders kept people at home more, and for many the people they live with are a source of comfort. For others, it’s a source of conflict or even danger. Suddenly, vulnerable individuals suffering abuse at the hands of a parent or partner, or LGBTQIA youth living with unsupportive family members, were cut off from their daily escapes and support systems. Without services specializing in providing safety and emotional support, they become more isolated. Tensions in the household rise. Abused partners and Queer youth have no professional confidential counseling to access quietly and privately through chats or text messages. There’s no emergency shelter to escape to.

Viruses and physical health have taken center stage this year, but the mental health toll is undeniable. We’ve been going through a collective, worldwide trauma. Everything familiar was disrupted and the entire concept of “normal” disappeared overnight. Many people are experiencing emotions they aren’t sure what to do with, and they aren’t ready to talk to their friends or loved ones. Others lack those connections and are processing things all on their own. Imagine a world without an outlet to help one cope with those feelings. No warmlines or impartial empathetic listeners, no crisis or suicide prevention services. The emotional suffering deepens and spreads, and we lose even more people to a different type of pandemic—suicide—that was present long before COVID-19.

So yes, 2020 was the worst, filled with more crises happening all at once than many of us could have imagined. And in a seemingly never-ending string of challenges, it may feel at times like your contributions, all your exhaustive efforts, aren’t making a dent. If reassurance and evidence of your impact seems elusive, think back to George Bailey’s tour of seedy Pottersville, the bad place version of Bedford Falls. Close your eyes and take a stroll through that scary, imaginary world without organizations like yours, and see that things could actually be much worse. It’s because of the good work of those who care, like you, that it isn’t.

Continue Reading No Comments

December Support Training: Referral Q Capacity Tracking and Provider Portal

The iCarol Support Team holds monthly trainings on topics that our customers want more information about. These trainings are offered on the third Wednesday of every month at 2pm Eastern.

Our topic for the December webinar is ReferralQ & Capacity Tracking and Provider Portal features.

ReferralQ and Capacity Tracking enables you to document and track referrals to a particular service that you work closely with, including information such as the service’s capacity to accept referrals. The Provider Portal is a separate product that complements ReferralQ by inviting your partners secure, direct access to view and update authorized ReferralQ information. With the Provider Portal your partners can input their program’s capacity to take referrals, obtain Contact Record or Intake information about the help-seekers referred to them, and update the status of a referred help-seeker as they work with the CBO.

We’re excited to share more information about these products with our customers on our next monthly training webinar!

Date: Wednesday, December 15
Time: 2pm Eastern

During this webinar, participants will learn:

  • What is the ReferralQ & Capacity Tracking feature?
  • What is the Provider Portal feature?
  • How can these features be used together?
  • What are some use cases for the features?

We welcome and encourage our customers to attend! You can find the registration link on the Admin Dashboard or in our Help Center announcements.

Continue Reading No Comments

Simple Ways to Make the Most of Giving Tuesday

In recent years, Giving Tuesday has emerged as a counterbalance to the consumer-based Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, and Cyber Monday shopping traditions. It serves as a reminder that the holiday season is about charitable acts of kindness and helping our neighbors in need. Giving Tuesday (this year it’s held on November 30th) is an excellent opportunity for non-profits and charities to tell their communities about the work they do and encourage charitable giving to their organization. Smaller organizations or those that may be completely volunteer based shouldn’t feel incapable of participating — you don’t need a dedicated marketing team to take part in Giving Tuesday.

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to sideline a lot of projects, but Giving Tuesday shouldn’t be one of them. Yes, there are extra precautions to take and you may have to adjust your plans to keep everyone safe and comply with any restrictions in place. By now you’ve had to creatively adapt to a lot of things in 2020 and 2021 — doing so for this event should be no problem! In fact, you should lean into fundraising efforts now more than ever — experts share that donors are focused on giving to local organizations, especially those who have provided direct response to the Coronavirus pandemic. However, it is important that you are extra sensitive and mindful that donors themselves are likely having a tough time, so carefully think through your messaging.

Below are some simple ideas to try that don’t take a large budget or tons of advanced planning.

  • Simple Social Media

    At a minimum, your social media accounts should publish posts about Giving Tuesday (remember to use the hashtag #GivingTuesday to maximize your reach!). Post throughout the day or schedule your posts ahead of time with social media management software like Hootsuite, Buffer, or Sprout Social. Posts should include a call to action, i.e. do you want them to donate? Volunteer? Learn more about your work? Become an advocate? Depending on the call to action, include links to applicable web pages such as your volunteer opportunity or donation pages. Posts can focus on the work you do, success stories (shared either with client permission or written to remove identifying info), milestones and achievements, goals, and other information that you’d like your community to know about you. Examples of general Giving Tuesday social media posts can be found here. We’re always happy to help you boost your Giving Tuesday social media messages, so be sure to follow us on Twitter so we can follow you back to see your posts in our feed, then we can retweet your message to our followers.

  • Share Video or Photos

    Images and video are more compelling than text-only posts, and most social media sites say that posts that include them get more views, so use them if you can. Lean into content that focuses on how your organization has worked through COVID-19 to continue providing services, and why the services you provide are needed now more than ever. Your video doesn’t have to be Academy Award worthy — spontaneous and unrehearsed videos are authentic and give people a sense of who you are. If you’re working in an office, try a quick interview with a colleague about what they do and why they love working for your agency. Those working remotely can submit videos filmed themselves at home. Videos should be short and sweet, as most research shows short videos are the most watched. For more video guidance, check out this article by London based creative advertising agency Don’t Panic.

    After taking the video you can usually do some light editing or clipping right on your phone before posting it to social media. If you’re feeling brave you can even do a live video right from platforms like TikTok, Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter, directly from a mobile phone.

  • Engage Your Neighbors

    Hopefully your organization is lucky enough to have some supporters in the business community that work with you throughout the year by holding fundraisers or making donations. Giving Tuesday is another perfect opportunity to engage with your biggest fans. Perhaps they’d be willing to post a short video to their social media feeds. Or maybe they’d do something as simple as keep a donation box or stack of your agency’s brochures at their register or other space in their business. Most businesses, especially those that already support your work, will welcome the opportunity to continue their advocacy during the holiday season. Many businesses are also motivated to align themselves with the work of non-profits especially now, to show that they are giving back to the community.

  • Work Your Website

    Your website is one of your greatest assets, especially now that so much of what we do is online rather than in-person, so make sure your Giving Tuesday participation is prominently featured there. This can be accomplished through something as simple as a blog post or homepage image, or more advanced like adding a new temporary banner or widget to your homepage that directs website visitors to your donation page, volunteer application, etc.

  • Don’t Let Callers Off the Hook

    If when people call you they first hear a general message or listen to a menu routing them to their desired destination, consider temporarily altering your greeting in honor of Giving Tuesday. This can be as simple as a 10-15 second “hello” wishing them a happy holiday season and inviting them to support your work, along with an invitation to visit your website for more information. This won’t add much at all to their wait time but will get your message in front of everyone who calls you.

  • Shop and Donate

    Did you know you can integrate Giving Tuesday into your donors’ other post-Thanksgiving activities like Black Friday and Cyber Monday? Some online retailers now offer donation integration as part of their shopping experience. The most well-known of these is the Amazon Smile program. Non-profits and charities can register their organization and shoppers can designate that agency as their charity of voice when shopping on the platform. Amazon donates a portion of eligible sales proceeds from those transactions back to the non-profit organization. It is remarkably easy for your donors to set this up when shopping — you simply need to get registered and promote it to those who support your work. Your donors can then do all their normal holiday shopping and support your services at the same time — WIN/WIN!

How is your agency planning to make the most of Giving Tuesday? Leave a comment below with your plans, or any ideas we may have missed! And be sure to follow iCarol on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, and we will try to share your Giving Tuesday post as our way of saying thanks for the work you do!

Continue Reading No Comments

This is a game changer – iCarol’s Resource Database API is now fully bi-directional

iCarol bidirectional resource api

Did you know that iCarol’s Resource Database API is now fully bi-directional?

What does this mean? iCarol Resource database records can now be created and/or updated using the API.

iCarol was a pioneer among the I&R and Contact Center Software vendors with our Resource Database API, which was first released in 2013.

We’ve done it again with these new enhancements that can now be done outside of iCarol, directly into to your iCarol Resource database using the Resource Database API:

  • Update, create, or delete resource records from external software systems
      Save time, increase efficiency, get new records from your partners quicker than ever—when time is of the essence

  • Decide to have new records and updates happen automatically, or as part of an automated verification process
      Maintain necessary control of how you want the partnerships to work, while having flexibility to change quickly as needed

  • And we’ve continued with the ability we’ve always had where you can provide different partners different key access with different permissions

Here are just some possibilities that have been discussed with this new enhancement:

  • Open the door to partnership ideas and revenue streams that were not possible before

  • Feed data to warehouses and/or reporting tools and accept changes to the records in iCarol from those external sources

  • Partner with other referral partners who may be on other information and referral software, in more ways than ever before

  • Allow more options to health and human service partners who need direct access your resource database and need to let you know of new additions and changes themselves

  • Make yourself more marketable to healthcare providers/for healthcare partnerships who may be interested in access to your resource database, and may want easier options to let you know of changes to resources

  • Collaboration, coalition and Community Information Exchange (CIE) efforts can be even more streamlined

An overview of capabilities that have been available for some time with the iCarol Resource API:

iCarol Resource API search details and public comments


And here’s what’s NEW:

iCarol API update method workflow

Now is the perfect time to explore what iCarol’s Bi-direction Resource API can do for your organization and your partners.

Are you a current iCarol user? As we’ve previously shared, our November Support Training is about the API! Join our webinar Wednesday, November 17th at 2:00pm Eastern. Register by signing in to iCarol and opening the iCarol Help Center where the webinar description and registration link is posted as an Announcement.

Get In Touch!

Email Us    Schedule a Meeting

Continue Reading No Comments

iCarol Career Opportunity – Director of Business Development and Marketing

join out team written with colorful letters and lollipops

Director of Business Development and Marketing – Remote

We are currently accepting applications for the position of Director of Business Development and Marketing.

The team member in this position is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Sales department, including Marketing and Communications. This position manages all employees of the department and is responsible for the performance management, hiring and training of the employees within that department.

What your impact will be:

  • Gather and analyze market data and industry trends.
  • Develop relevant annual sales strategies that are congruent with market analyses of a competitive sector
  • Build and execute against aggressive growth plans
  • Build strong prospect/customer relationships
  • Generate leads through all necessary channels
  • Build a strong pipeline of qualified prospects
  • Attend sales presentations
  • Achieve sales goals and enable team to achieve targets through efficient management and constant support
  • Prepare reports detailing the status of all accounts
  • Prepare and maintain the monthly sales bookings forecast
  • Work to create a marketing brand
  • Oversee conference attendance and participation to help drive new business and grow the market awareness of the company.
  • Manage/realign territories as needed
  • Understand and monitor the win/loss rates to be able to determine ROI for each activity. Understand the sales cycle within each vertical and design sales strategies that drive organic growth.
  • Handle the financial resources (revenue and spending allocated to the department, cost control, etc.) and provide forecast updates and reporting as required.
  • Make sure customers are satisfied during and after service delivery and process complaints, if any
  • Be an ambassador for the use of iCarol and suggest best practices for its use
  • Some travel is required.
  • Collaboration with other iCarol teams and departments to seek out and share ideas for process improvements to help guide the company’s growth and ensure a quality product for our client base.

What we are looking for:

  • 3 to 5+ years of experience in software or institutional sales management
  • Superior oral and written skills
  • Demonstrated ability to determine and then transform customer needs/requirements into an opportunity for the company
  • Strong business development experience
  • Experience in client prospecting or seeking funding or partnership opportunities
  • High level of problem solving and analytical skills
  • Experience carrying a sales quota and achieving success of this quota Experience building out a high-performance team
  • Ability to work in a team and be hands on with customers in achieving their success
  • Strong critical thinking skills, decisiveness, and willingness to appropriately accept risk
  • Experience in industry, technology needs associated to industry, and in introducing new products is an asset
  • Experience with Zoho CRM and managing a CRM as an administrator.

What will make you standout?

  • iCarol software experience
  • Previous experience selling to charitable or non-profit organizations, securing funding, or building successful partnerships/programs, for a non-profit is preferred.

Learn More and Apply

Continue Reading No Comments

Stigma is Scary – People Living With Mental Illness Are Not

pumpkins stacked on top of a bale of hay

One of the things I like most about Halloween is that it offers such a wide range of ways to participate and have fun. Horror movies not your thing? You can stick to fun activities like carving a jack-o-lantern and handing out candy to trick or treaters (in normal, non-pandemic years at least). And then there are the endless costume possibilities. You can be anything from a superhero to your favorite movie character to some very obscure cultural reference or the more traditional choice of ghost or vampire.

So with that range of costume possibilities and ways to have fun in mind, it’s always deeply upsetting to see Halloween become an event where mental illness is misrepresented and stigmatized. Some haunted house attractions are centered around “asylum” themes, or have a “haunted psych ward” component. Actors wearing straight jackets or wielding weapons chase visitors and shout lines about hearing voices. The message is very clear: Mental illness, and people who experience mental illness, are scary, violent, and to be feared.

In recent years, several costumes have been pulled from the shelves following pressure from mental health advocates. Unfortunately every year there are still a few new inappropriate and offensive costumes that pop up and make their way to stores and online retailers, and regrettably they are eventually seen out in public at bars and parties. And each time one is sold and then worn, it perpetuates the stigma and misconceptions around mental illness.

These interjections of mental illness into Halloween are neither fun nor harmless, but keep in place harmful stereotypes. These attractions and costumes continue pushing the idea that a person living with mental illness is violent and should be avoided. Discrimination is still a problem for people living with mental illness, and every day those who experience symptoms choose not to seek help for fear of mistreatment by the public, or that their relationships with family and friends will suffer. These depictions also hurt those who have experienced mental illness, especially those who have been hospitalized. Their deepest fears about what society thinks of them are realized when they see illness become a subject of fear-based entertainment.

It would never be acceptable to have haunted houses set in a hospice or cancer wing of a hospital, nor would we find cancer patient costumes to be appropriate. It’s important that we all speak up when we see mental illness being stigmatized, and stand up for those who have experience with illness and are negatively impacted by the perpetuation of stigma.

Continue Reading 5 Comments

iCarol Career Opportunity – Client Support Implementation Specialist (CSIS)

join out team written with colorful letters and lollipops

Client Support Implementation Specialist (CSIS) – Remote

Are you a current or former user of iCarol Software with a belief in and passion for the missions of non-profit helplines and contact centers? Would you enjoy guiding new iCarol users through their onboarding process as they prepare to use iCarol at their not-for-profit helpline? Do you enjoy troubleshooting problems to find solutions, and guiding people to answers that will help them? If you answered “yes” to these questions, you could be the next member of the iCarol Support Team!

We are currently accepting applications for the position of Client Support and Implementation Specialist

The Client Support and Implementation Specialist 1 (CSIS1) is responsible for implementing new name and back to base sales, answering complex questions, contributing to a knowledge base, and advocating for the needs of the client. The CSIS is accountable for ensuring continuity of computer system services by providing the technical expertise, the assistance and project coordination necessary to maintain computer software products, and resolve technical problems.

What your impact will be:

  • Configure new systems and features and train clients how to use iCarol to best meet their organizations’ needs
  • Monitors and answers incoming support chats and tickets, working directly with customers to help solve problems
  • Resolves issues or escalates issues to CSIS2 when more expertise is needed
  • Assists with release management by testing bug fixes and software enhancements, and other upgrade rollout tasks as required
  • Stay abreast on the latest developments in software through self-learning/training
  • Uses discretion to effect timely solution of problems to ensure customer satisfaction, eliminate downtime and prevent cost overruns
  • Maintains client relationships
  • Aids in creating and providing support documentation
  • Identifies solutions for customers related to potential up sales, escalating to the Sales Team when needed
  • Exercises sound professional judgment in analysis of problems to: (1) attempt hardware/software solution by screenshare, or (2) decide proper level of maintenance required to solve problem
  • Other duties as assigned

What we are looking for:

  • Honesty, patience, and motivation are core values of the iCarol team
  • A passionate belief in the mission of help lines and respect for their callers
  • A high degree of responsiveness to client requests and issues
  • Strong proficiency and comfort using computers and the web
  • General to intermediate knowledge of computers, internet browsers (Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, etc.) and Microsoft Office products (Word, Excel, PowerPoint)
  • Project management skills will be a plus
  • Due to the nature of the work our clients do (ie. you will have access to client ePHI), our policies require you to sign a confidentiality agreement and pass a basic criminal background check in addition to annual HIPAA security training.

What will make you standout?

  • At least 2 years of experience working at a help line, preferably both on the phones and in an administrative role
  • At least 2 years of experience as an iCarol Admin
  • Bachelor’s degree preferred

Learn More and Apply

Continue Reading No Comments

© 2022 iCarol, a Division of N. Harris Computer Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

iCarol helpline software   iCarol helpline software   iCarol helpline software   iCarol helpline software