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Posts Tagged ‘suicide prevention’

iCarol attending the AAS Conference

From March 30 through April 2, members of our team will be in Chicago for the 49th American Association of Suicidology Conference.

We’ll have a booth at the conference and you’ll see us at many of the events and sessions, too. It’s important to us to learn about and be aware of all the latest research and the expanding needs of helplines as they work to build suicide-safer communities. There’s nothing more important to us than helping you save lives.

We look forward to reconnecting with old friends and meeting new ones, too. We’ll be there to talk about iCarol with anyone who would like to learn more and is considering helpline software for their organization. Members of our Product Management team will be on hand, too, and would welcome your specific feedback about how iCarol’s been working for you, and your thoughts on particular features. Please look us up at the conference, or beforehand if you’d like to set up a time to talk.

We look forward to seeing you and learning about all the latest on the life-saving work being done by our helpline industry so that we can continue to build our systems to support you.

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AAS Presents: Harnessing the Presence of a Teachable Moment to Improve Care for Suicide Attempt Survivors

On Friday March 11th from 12:00 – 1:00pm EST, the American Association of Suicidology will present a webinar titled “Harnessing the Presence of a Teachable Moment to Improve Care for Suicide Attempt Survivors.”

Description: The population of suicide attempt survivors treated in acute inpatient medical settings is heterogeneous in nature, ranging from those who made a near-lethal attempt with little intent to die to others treated for a serious premeditated suicide attempt meant to result in death. As such, discharge planning will vary based upon multiple factors, including medical coverage, resource allocation, and patient motivation to engage in mental health services. While patients stabilize physically, hospitals could . . . Read More

This webinar is offered free of charge to AAS members, and is just $35 for non-members.

Register now

AAS membership offers learning opportunities like this webinar, discounts on conferences, publications, and training, and more. Click here to learn more.

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ONTX releases six months in review data

These past six months, the Ontario Online and Text Crisis Services program has been in a soft launch phase, and on Monday in their monthly newsletter they released some initial data for that period.

Some key findings:

  • Total chats and texts through January 31: 4,700
  • 73% of visitors are under 25 years old
  • Interpersonal and mental health issues were the most common topics of discussion
  • Visitors are reporting a decrease in distress following their chat
  • 55% of visitors said they wouldn’t contact someone else if they couldn’t reach ONTX

For a full look at the released findings click here, and for future updates be sure to sign up for Distress and Crisis Ontario’s newsletter by emailing your request to .

We thank them for sharing these findings — we are often asked by others looking to add online emotional support to their service what they can expect. Data like this is very helpful as other prepare to make the critical shift of bringing their services online.

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March is Problem Gambling Awareness Month

As we head into March, it’s time to have the conversation about Problem Gambling. From the National Council on Problem Gambling:

NCPG encourages everyone to Have the Conversation about Problem Gambling. Most adults gamble or know someone who gambles, and therefore could benefit from programs to prevent gambling addiction. We believe many who suffer in silence do so because they don’t know why they developed a problem, what gambling addiction is or where to get help.

Statistics suggest that 5 million Americans and more than 1 million Canadians meet the criteria for gambling addictions. Of those who struggle with a gambling problem, 75% will also have issues with alcohol and an estimated 38% with other drugs. A staggering 1 in 5 people with a gambling problem will either attempt suicide or die by suicide. This is the highest rate of suicide among all addictions. Advocates are working hard to ensure that problem gambling is addressed as the public health issue it is, but unfortunately many still incorrectly view it as a moral failing or issue of “weak will” much like the stigma that alcohol and drug use has faced in the past.

Problem gamblers achieve the same effect from gambling as someone else might get from taking a drug or from drinking. The act of gambling alters their mood. A problem gambler who once achieved a “high” from winning or the rush of playing will continue chasing that same feeling. And just as individuals build up a tolerance to the affects of drugs or alcohol, the same can happen with a problem gambler. As they engage in the gambling activity of their choice, it takes more and more of the experience to achieve the same emotional effect they desire.

It’s important to discuss the topic of problem gambling with the help-seekers who reach your helpline who may be at risk or are showing signs of problem gambling. There are specific resources to point them to that can help them confront these issues, discuss them with non-judgmental listeners, and receive referrals for assistance. Visit NCPG’s website for information and resources. You’ll also find the number where you can call/text for help (1-800-522-4700) and a link to their live chat.

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CONTACT Care Line opens new call center

In December we passed along the news that our friends at CONTACT Care Line would open a new call center this year.

We’re excited to convey an update that the call center opened in January. We have no doubt that the dedicated staff and volunteers have been enjoying the new space. They have temporary furniture in place. Why is it only temporary? This worthy organization is getting some decorating help from professionals. From a recent mailing:

The Interior Design Society of East TN is working with us to plan, design, furnish, and decorate our new space. We’ll roll out the red carpet and invite you to come for a look once they’ve finished giving us an HGTV styled make-over! The wonderful professionals of the Interior Design Society are donating their time and expertise to give our volunteers a beautiful and highly functional setting in which to work. And, CONTACT is deeply grateful!

We’re so happy to hear this fantastic news and hope you’ll join us in congratulating this awesome organization. There’s nothing quite like a professional space that was designed with love and purpose and care to make the staff and volunteers of a helpline feel valued and appreciated as they do hard, life-saving work.

If you’re lucky enough to live in the Knoxville area, we hope you’ll consider attending CONTACT Care Line’s “Bursting the Blues” event on March 5th that will benefit the crisis call center. More details and ticket information is available here.

We always want to spread the word about the great work and accomplishments of helplines. Got a story to share? Please !

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Improve your follow-up participation

The success of your follow-up program hinges in part on how many contacts you can make and how much outcome data you can collect. And that is very dependent upon how many help-seekers will agree to take part in your program.

Asking a client to agree to a follow-up can be intimidating, and it takes skill and experience to ensure their participation. Here are some tips guaranteed to turn more of your inbound contacts into follow-up opportunities.

Build rapport – The success or failure of getting a caller to agree to a follow-up contact actually begins from the first moments of the call. Building rapport and trust between the specialist and help-seeker is a key component to the success of the call itself, but also impacts the chances of future contacts. If your specialist struggles to make a connection, or the client doesn’t feel heard or helped, they’re unlikely to welcome a call back. But, if your help-seeker feels connected to the call specialist and feels a sense of trust, they’re much more likely to agree to hear from your service again.

Don’t ask – One strategy that will help you get a “Yes” is to not ask them the question at all. Asking someone, “Can I call you back tomorrow?” gives them a choice of saying “Yes” or “No.” What if you make the assumption that they want to hear back from you? Instead of asking permission, try telling them you’re going to reach out to them again, and put them in position of having to refuse. Sound uncomfortable? It’s all about the delivery and can take some skill to pull off. Some example phrasing:

  • “I’m so glad you reached out to us today. Hey, I’m going to call you back tomorrow just to see how things are going, what time is good for you?”

  • “I want to check in and see how you’re feeling tomorrow, what’s the best number to reach you at?”

  • “Just to be sure you got everything you needed, I’m going to call you back to make sure those referrals could help you. How’s Thursday afternoon?”

  • “When we get back in touch to check in, what works better for you, should I text you or call you?”

  • “We want to help you through this, I’ll check in again tomorrow to see how you’re feeling.”
If done correctly, your client won’t feel pushed or pressured, they’ll feel cared for.

Pick your moment – There’s no rule saying that you have to schedule the follow-up contact at the end of the interaction. If there’s a moment earlier in the call that feels right, take the opportunity then. Maybe it’s when you’re giving referral information, or at a moment when the person needs to be reassured that you truly care. If you find that moment at some point earlier in the conversation, schedule the follow-up then, or at a minimum, plant the seed, and continue your conversation. Then come back to the topic at the end of the call to remind them you’ll be following up and firm up the details.

Avoid the “S” Word – Surveys and feedback are important, no doubt, and there’s a great likelihood you’ll need to collect data from the client when you follow-up. But, there’s usually no reason the help-seeker needs to know this when scheduling the follow-up. The word “survey” can be a turn off to many people, so knowing this is expected of them may discourage the very thought of being called back. If you must give them notice of this, then the word “feedback” may be safer (e.g. We’d like to call you back and get your feedback”). If possible, don’t mention either when you’re scheduling the follow-up contact. Instead…

Make it about them – The client should feel like you’re following up because you care, because you want to know they’re okay, because you want to continue helping. This shouldn’t be hard, because of course you DO care and you DO want to keep helping! The more you make them feel like there’s nothing in it for you, and that it’s all about being there for them, the better your chances that they’ll want to hear from you again. And the more successfully you do this, the more eager they’ll be to give back to you by answering your survey questions when the time comes.

Continue helping – Speaking of what’s in it for them, don’t forget to let your callers know that they have something to gain from hearing from you again. Having the chance to talk about their situation again may be an attractive prospect. Maybe you can offer them additional referrals, or brainstorm more options with them dependent upon what’s transpired since you last spoke. If they feel like you’re an ally on this journey with them, they’ll welcome continued contact.

Give them options – Give your help-seekers options for how they can hear back from you, and consider how they reached you as a guide for how they may wish to be contacted again. Phone callers may wish to be called back, but make sure they know you can text them or email them, too, if those provisions are in place. Research conducted by Varolii Corporation in 2013 found that text messaging was quickly becoming the preferred channel of communication for most American consumers, and one in five consumers were equally likely to prefer a text message as they are receiving a voice call. Consider your client’s age as well – 36% of 18 to 24 year olds said a text message was their preferred form of communication with businesses. For help-seekers whose initial interaction happened via live chat or text, there’s a good chance they’ll reject a follow-up by phone. Convenience may be key for some clients; your ability to reach back out by alternative channels could improve the chances they’ll agree to future contacts from your service.

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9-1-1 texting continues to gain ground

We’ve talked before about how sometimes the need for silence will influence people to use texting instead of a voice call. Sometimes silence isn’t preferred, but necessary, such as in this recent instance of a deaf woman who texted 9-1-1 after she noticed some children left unattended at a shopping mall. Luckily texting to 9-1-1 was enabled in her area.

Texting to 9-1-1 is continuing its expansion throughout the United States and Canada. The Canadian Wireless Telecommunication Association has set up an extensive and detailed website giving overview of the Text-to-911 process in Canada.

In the United States, it seems like each month more and more jurisdictions are adding on texting capabilities. A quick scan of recent news articles about texting 9-1-1 in the US produces alerts about the greater Kansas City area, Minnesota, areas in Texas, and northern California. Note that each of those articles was published this week. It all points to rapid expansion of that technology.

Just another sign of the times as we continue to see just how convenient, efficient, and often necessary texting can be when reaching out for help. We hope helplines will take note as this capability expands and explore texting for the helpline service to follow suit. If you want to learn how Texting works in iCarol, please join me for a Messaging webinar sometime!

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Veterans Administration Suicide Prevention Summit

Today the Veterans Administration is sponsoring a national summit on veteran suicide prevention in Washington, D.C.

From Under Secretary for Health, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Dr. David J. Shulkin’s announcement of the summit:

The “Preventing Veteran Suicide – A Call to Action” summit will bring together VA and DoD leaders, mental health professionals, Veteran Service Organizations, Veterans and their families, and other key partners. These national leaders will direct their attention to how we can best help Veterans and their families access appropriate mental health services.

It will be an honor to welcome Susan and Richard Selke, as guests at the summit. Their son, Clay Hunt, was a Marine Corps Veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan who took his own life in 2011. Congress subsequently passed the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans Act, which President Obama signed in February of last year. Their commitment to improving mental health care for Veterans like their son has been inspiring.

If you’re interested in following the discussion coming out of the summit, search #PreventVetSuicide and follow @DeptVetAffairs on Twitter.

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Helpline Industry Events and Dates in 2016

Want to know all that’s going on in the helpline industry in 2016? We’ve compiled a list of events and conferences, dates of recognition and awareness, and more.

January
Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month
Stalking Awareness Month
No Name-Calling Week (January 18-22)
Bell Let’s Talk Day (January 27)

February
Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month
2-1-1 Day (February 11)
Eating Disorders Awareness Week (February 21-27)

March
National Problem Gambling Awareness Month
Brain Injury Awareness Month
Self Harm Awareness Month
Social Work Month
Transgender Day of Visibility (March 31)

April
American Association of Suicidology (AAS) Conference iCarol icon
Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month
Volunteer Appreciation Week (April 10-16)
Child Abuse Prevention Month
Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) Awareness Month

May
Alliance of Information and Referral Systems (AIRS) Conference iCarol icon
Mental Health Awareness Month
Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week (May 1-7)

June
Cancer Survivors Day (June 5)
LGBTQIA Pride Month
PTSD Awareness Month
PTSD Awareness Day (June 27)

July
Minority Mental Health Month
National Council on Problem Gambling Conference iCarol icon

August
Be Kind to Humankind Week
National Breastfeeding Month
World Breastfeeding Week (August 1-7)

September
Suicide Prevention Week (September 5-11)
World Suicide Prevention Day (September 10)
National Drug and Alcohol Addiction Recovery Month
World Alzheimer’s Month
Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month
Healthy Aging Month

October
NASCOD/CUSA Conference iCarol icon
Domestic Violence Awareness Month
Bullying Prevention Month
Mental Illness Awareness Week

November
National Adoption Month
National Runaway Prevention Month
Information and Referral Day (November 16)
International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day (November 19)
Transgender Day of Remembrance (November 20)
Giving Tuesday (November 29)

December
World AIDS Day
National Family Caregivers Month

iCarol icon = Conference/Event that iCarol plans to attend

Did we miss any? If so, please leave us a comment and help us add more dates of recognition and events to our list.

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iCarol Clients in the News

Earlier this week, US President Barack Obama laid out plans and proposals aimed at curbing the epidemic of gun violence in the United States.

His comments included a desire to help people living with mental illness get the care they need. Our friends at the North Carolina chapter of NAMI were interviewed and provided comments for this story. See the video below, and you can click here for the full article accompanying the video.

Our thanks to NAMI and all of you who are providing your expertise on this critical issue. It’s a delicate subject; on one hand we must have conversations about mental illness and firearms especially as it pertains to suicide and also gun access by those who may be experiencing intense pain, clouded judgment, or issues of perception due to a mental illness. It’s imperative that communities have the tools they need to help at-risk individuals and others who may be suffering, with more funding for intervention, proper care, community training, and other services.

At the same time as we have these discussions, we must be extremely careful not to inadvertently suggest that those experiencing mental illness are inherently violent or should be feared, as this is categorically untrue and not supported by statistics, and it only adds to the prejudices and stigma associated with mental illness that keeps so many from getting the help they need. We’re inspired by how so many of your organizations are intelligently contributing to this conversation and striking that delicate balance so well.

Want to add to this discussion? Share your thoughts with us by leaving a comment below! Is your agency taking action on this topic or participating in events, providing expert commentary, or otherwise taking part in the discussion on this topic? We’d love to hear about it so we can highlight your work on our blog. You can comment below, or .

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